Do You Have Thriving Organizational Wellbeing? Ask Yourself These Questions

The right culture makes all the difference for every stakeholder in your company — you, as the employer, your employees, and your customers/clients. You get more productive workers who think critically and creatively to ensure they are contributing everything they can. Employees feel valued and appreciated, so they enjoy and are engaged in their work; and this promotes their physical and emotional health as well. Your customers/clients receive top-quality products and/or service from workers who take pride in what they do.

But how can you tell if you have thriving organizational wellbeing? Start by honestly answering these questions with your team:

  • Is the executive leadership team truly a cohesive one?
  • Do the leaders work together as a team and give consistent direction to employees?
  • Are the mission, vision, and values clearly articulated and shared/ reinforced continually and not just brushed over during new employee orientation? Do all employees know how they fit within the vision and values so employees understand why they and their work matter?
  • Are employees empowered and enabled to leverage their strengths and encouraged to take initiative in situations?
  • Do leaders and the work climate provide employees with autonomous support (versus using incentives/penalties to drive behaviors)?
  • Is clear, timely, and meaningful communication provided for employees? Do employees share ideas and feedback that management actually listens to and uses?
  • Do managers and leaders provide clear, timely, and meaningful feedback for employees in the spirit of ongoing growth and development (versus simply measuring performance)?
  • Does the climate foster innovation, creativity, and meaningful work?
  • Do leaders truly value employees? Do employees feel valued?
  • Are employees encouraged and supported to be authentic and be themselves?
  • Do people within the organization respect, support, and care about one another as people, not just as employees there to complete certain job tasks?
  • Is accountability embraced? Are rules clear and apply to everyone?
  • Are employees given the tools and resources to work safely and productively?
  • Do resources, programs, policies, and the environment support employees’ to thrive in all areas of wellbeing?
  • Are employees happy and proud to work for your organization?

If you answered “no” to any of these questions or had to pause and didn’t know for sure whether you could honestly answer “yes,” it’s time to focus on understanding your company’s culture. Chances are good that your organization could use some help and needs to make a shift in the way it thinks and operates.

Where to go from here?

  • TAKE this quick FREE Audit – You’ll receive immediate feedback on the health of your workplace culture and advice on what to do.
  • ATTEND our Thriving Workplace Culture Certification™ course – check here for upcoming class schedules.

Rosie Ward, PhD, MPH, MCHES, BCC, CIC®, CVS-FR Rosie is an accomplished speaker, writer and consultant. She has spent more than 20 years in worksite health promotion and organizational development. In addition to her bachelor’s degrees in Kinesiology and Public Health, and a doctorate in Organization and Management, Rosie is also a Certified Intrinsic Coach® Mentor, Certified Judgment Index Consultant, a Certified Valuations Specialist, and a Board Certified Coach. Rosie uses this unique combination to work with executive and leadership teams to create comprehensive development strategies centered on shifting thinking patterns. She is a contributing author to the book, “Organization Development in Healthcare — High Impact Practices for a Complex and Changing Environment.” She leverages these principles to help organizations develop and implement strategies to create a thriving workplace culture that values and supports wellbeing and the unique, intrinsic needs of employees. Contact Rosie at rosie@salveopartners.com or drrosieward.com.

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