Blog Archives

Stop trying to motivate your employees!

When I was a kid, my mom decided to expand our family’s collective palate and serve sauerkraut for dinner. For the three of us under age 10, this was tantamount to torture. We spent the first hour at the table crying and begging for something else, but finally, two of us choked down a few […]

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Dealing With a Jerk at Work? Here’s What to Do

It only takes one jerk to make a workplace miserable – and if that jerk is a manager, the consequences are even worse. Research shows that employees’ trapped working for a jerk at work may exhibit: Physical and mental sickness, including anxiety, insomnia, depression, high blood pressure, and heart disease Increased burn-out Reduced productivity, engagement […]

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Creating a Jerk-Free Workplace Culture

If you’ve ever had a boss or colleague who caused you to exclaim, “What a Jerk!” you know the impact one person can have on both organizational and employee wellbeing. In fact, a recent Washington Post article explores the research on the negative impact bad bosses have on physical and psychological health. Because the quality […]

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Lessons from Highly Successful Businesses that Have Built a Thriving Workplace Culture

In our new book, “How to Build a Thriving Culture at Work, Featuring the 7 Points of Transformation,” we provide a conceptualization of Thriving Organizational Wellbeing that serves as a foundation for sustainable high performance, and we highlight companies that are making their competition irrelevant by creating the conditions for both organizational and employee wellbeing […]

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You Can’t Use a Paperclip to Solve Wellbeing Issues

In the show MacGyver, the lead character was known for creatively using objects and resources to help escape life-threatening situations. In one episode, he diffused a bomb at the last second using a paperclip. Real life is not so simple — especially when it comes to changing human behavior. Yet the way we typically approach […]

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Why Trying to “Get” People to Change Doesn’t Work

How many people do you know who love to be told what to do? My guess is not many. Yet why do we continue to treat people as if they are replicable and predictable robots that we can manipulate and control to do what we want? The only thing predictable about human beings is that […]

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The Power of the Pause

Words and language are powerful. There’s a reason why we call ourselves “Human BEINGS” rather than “Human DOINGS.” Yet, far too often, the way we go about trying to promote change ignores the importance of being and jumps right to the “doing” — frequently adding more “stuff” onto an already overloaded plate — and it […]

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Not All Coaching is Created Equal!

Trying to control biomedical risk factors and lifestyle behaviors with carrots and sticks does not make sense given the complexities of the human experience. If you want to support employees in thriving in their wellbeing and embarking upon a meaningful, sustainable change journey, create the conditions to support them and then let them be the […]

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To Incent or Not to Incent…What Really Works?

“Insanity: Doing the same things over and over and expecting a different result.” – Albert Einstein No one disputes the genius of Einstein. Yet, we keep relying on doing what we’ve always done when it comes to trying to motivate others to bring about behavior change; truly insane. This thinking is outdated and faulty, and […]

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“Engagement” in Wellness Programs: Separating Fact from Fiction

We receive e-mails almost weekly from various wellness vendors, professional organizations, and publications with articles, webinars, and programs offering solutions for increasing participation and building “engagement” into wellness programs. However, in every case it is evident there is a fundamental confusion on what engagement really is and why it matters. Let’s look at how Miriam-Webster […]

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